EXHIBITIONS :: CURRENT
April 4-June 15, 2014
Delmar Loop Charak Gallery

Opening Reception:
April 4, 2014, 6-8pm


"Were girls allowed to play with blocks in past generations? Do girls play with blocks now?  I have been working within the typical rectangle format of most paintings, prints and handwoven tapestries. Then, I played with a horizontal format to emphasize a cropped face, focusing on the eyes. This format led to the idea of blocks, the blocks we, or society, put before or around us. Why not use a block format, reminiscent of children’s ABC blocks?

Each block is handwoven at on a loom. I began by mounting them each on a square, 10” x 10” stretcher frame. The square idea quickly moved to thinking about designing and weaving actual three-dimensional blocks. “Flat Out” took shape; tapestries designed and woven to be folded and sewn into 3D. Traditional handwoven tapestry has always been a graphic, image-oriented, narrative medium.

Deann Rubin: Flat Out

A is for Apple

Deann Rubin: Flat Out

A is for Apple detail

Deann Rubin: Flat Out

A is for Apple detail

Deann Rubin: Flat Out

Color Pencil Detail

Deann Rubin: Flat Out

Jesture

 

Technically, each piece is an experiment or a learning experience. I tried several different wires woven into the weaving for structure (jewelry wire, plastic-coated wire, orist wire). The first block, was designed and woven in two pieces, containing three sides each. The smaller pieces were woven as one unit. Because the sides are woven together, some sides are woven upside down or sideways. The “M for Moth” pieces I think of, structurally, as the sliced corners of a block. Graphically,
the winged image beautifully rounds a corner.

The face that I have been using is an abstracted face of a woman I drew from a cover on TV guide magazine. The woman was from “Mad Men.” The woman is a dumb blond that is not so dumb. My quick sketch of her eyes, eyebrows, nose, reminded me of a Japanese calligraphy- beautiful lines. I have been using these 
lines in different contexts, environments, colors, to see how the face and mood change, just as we do in life. The series started with the handwoven tapestry “Play Girl”. I continue to play, transforming the art out into new dimensions."
                                                      -Deann Rubin


Deann Rubin has drawn all her life. Her graphic art deals with line, color, texture and pattern. Her work centers on human and urban imagery.

Educationally, Deann Rubin holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Design from The University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas, in 1968. She has a two-year certificate in computer graphics and another two-year certificate in illustration from Collin County Community College in Plano, Texas, in 1998. She has taken classes at Chelsea College and St. Martins in London, England and fine craft workshops at Haystack and Penland. Deann completed an apprenticeship with the tapestry artist Muriel Nezhnie Helfman, in 1978-80.

Known as a fiber artist, Deann has exhibited her handwoven tapestries nationally and internationally, including St. Petersburg, Russia, Australia and Canada. She has had work in the American Tapestry Alliance’s International Biennials 8 and 9, and ATA Small Tapestry International exhibits “Passages” and “Connections.”

Her tapestries have been exhibited locally at the Jacoby Art Center in Alton, Illinois, THE GALLERY at The University City Public Library, the Foundry Art Centre and Missouri History Museum. Her work has been seen on Channel 9 television in St. Louis and shown in many professional magazines, newspapers and Fiberarts Design books. Her work has been in “Fiber 577”, Ohio, Olive Hyde Art Gallery, California, the California Craft Museum, San Francisco, CA, American Textile Museum, Lowell, MA, Anchorage Museum of Art and History, Alaska and the Rosicrucian Museum Art Gallery, San Jose, CA.



Opening concurrently in the National Gallery: Good as Gold

© 2009 Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design      DELMAR LOOP: 6640 Delmar Blvd, STL, MO 63130      GRAND CENTER: 501 N Grand Blvd, STL, MO 63103   Bookmark and Share