EXHIBITIONS
 
Between the Lines: Bunny Burson and Roy Strassberg
August 26 – October 23, 2016

Opening reception: 
Friday, August 26, 6 – 8pm

Between the Lines

"Her Hand" by Bunny Burson

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"Black House" by Roy Strassberg

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"Hidden in Plain Sight" by Bunny Burson

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"Fragment Jar" by Roy Strassberg

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"History is so Present" by Bunny Burson

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"Monuments" by Roy Strassberg

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"Map 1" by Bunny Burson

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"White Bone Box" by Roy Strassberg

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Funding for this exhibition is provided by Sheila Greenbaum and Gary Wasserman, Nancy and Ken Kranzberg,  JoAnn and Ted Sanditz, Anabeth and John Weil of Pershing Place Foundation.
 
All works of Bunny Burson courtesy of Bruno David Gallery.

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ARTISTS TALK:
Thursday, August 25, 7pm
Holocaust Museum & Learning Center
12 Millstone Campus Drive
In partnership with the Holocaust Museum, Bunny Burson and Roy Strassberg will both be presenting the ideas, research and techniques involved in their artistic practice.
 
Free, limited seating. RSVP Required. Contact Andrew Goldfeder: 314-442-3711 oragoldfeder@jfedstl.org
 
The Holocaust Museum & Learning Center is sponsoring the Artists Talk, generously underwritten by the Jerry and Joan Kaskowitz Fund. For more information about the HMLC visit www.hmlc.org.

Between the Lines

Both Roy Strassberg and Bunny Burson’s works pull from memories and research of the Holocaust. As first generation American Jews with family stories from this haunting time, Strassberg and Burson’s marks contain a raw and arresting energy. Reading between those lines, viewers may investigate the deeply personal stories that begin to rise to the surface of the works. Here, marks become memories in service of tikkum olam – a Jewish concept translated as acts which might repair the world.
 
Roy Strassberg
Strassberg is a ceramic artist living in North Carolina. He studied with ceramist Richard Zakin at the State University of New York at Oswego where he earned his BA in 1972. He went on to earn his MFA in ceramics at the University of Michigan where he studied with John Stephenson. Strassberg has exhibited extensively, both regionally and nationally, and is represented in numerous museum, corporate, and private collections including several pieces in the art museum collection of Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, Israel, the pre-eminent repository in the world for work related to the Holocaust.
 
His early work included ceramic depictions of guard towers, chimneys and barracks adorned with abstract markings and geometric forms. Later, his work focused on assembled bone-like ceramic pieces called the Holocaust Bone Structures series. Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design exhibited this series in 2008.
Strassberg is currently creating bone boxes and large structures or monuments. Drawing directly onto his vessels, he continues to explore inherited and cultural trauma through gestural mark making. The ceramic surfaces are informed in turn by Midcentury Modern design as well as topographical photographs and maps of concentration camps.

Bunny Burson
Bunny Burson received a BA in French from Tulane University, which included a year at the Sorbonne in Paris. She then studied at the Memphis College of Art where she earned a BFA in printmaking. Burson earned her MFA in printmaking and drawing from Washington University in St. Louis. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally in St. Louis, New York, Memphis, Nashville, Colorado and Leipzig, Germany. Recent awards include an artist residency at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris and the Washington University School of Art Award for Distinction. She is represented by Bruno David Gallery in St. Louis.
 
Burson's Hidden in Plain Sight deeply engages with a particular form of writing—the private correspondence exchanged between her grandparents and her mother during World War II—while also enacting a form of storytelling in its own right. The artist book takes up the personal act of writing and, by extension; reading as its subject and in so doing becomes an exploration of the ambiguity and impermanence that is at the heart of communication itself.  
 
Burson explores notions of separation and distance, commemorating loss through printmaking, sculpture and artist books. She draws from over 100 old letters written to her mother from her grandparents ranging from 1939 – 1941, who had sent Burson’s mother to the United States to protect her from the growing hatred in Europe. The letters speak of their attempts to flee to other regions of Europe in order to escape the Nazi regime. Burson uses the handwritten German of her grandparents as her line work, layering them to create graphic patterns reminiscent of landscapes.
 
This exhibition is part of the St. Louis Arts Experience, a citywide arts collaboration from September 30 through October 16. Discover your passion at STLartsExperi
ence.org 

News & Coverage
Holocaust themes unite artists’ different media, St. Louis Jewish Light, August 17, 2016


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